Inspiring Success

A blog from Creating IT Futures

  • November 27, 2017

    After graduating from IT-Ready, veteran takes upwardly mobile career path in IT

    IMG_5849 In 2012, IT-Ready gave Michael Dauffenbach, a National Guardsman transitioning into the civilian workforce, the knowledge and skills he needed to secure full-time employment in the IT industry.
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  • May 30, 2017

    Workforce development programs lead to great jobs with great benefits

    #FacesOf_Week8_Joel In 2012, Joel Mielke found himself at the point of despair. In his words, he was at a point in his life when he felt he had nothing to offer society and nothing he could contribute of value. IT-Ready helped the displaced auto-manufacturing worker establish an upwardly mobile career in information technology.
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  • April 20, 2017

    The future’s so bright, he’s gotta wear shades

    JohnAmakye IT-Ready grad John Amakye continues to acquire new skills, move up the IT career ladder.
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  • April 18, 2017

    First IT-Ready Class of 2017 Graduates with Jobs in Hand

    GroupPhoto Our first IT-Ready class of 2017 graduated last month, and already 78 percent of the graduates have jobs.
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  • October 11, 2016

    Tech industry employer, Atomic Data, finds well-prepared professionals in IT-Ready grads

    When hiring managers at Atomic Data interview candidates for vacant positions, the softer professional skills the candidates possess often are just as important as technical knowledge. That’s why Atomic Data has hired 9 graduates from IT-Ready — because they come to work already knowing the day-to-day expectations of a tech professional.
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  • June 23, 2016

    Study suggests grouping women working within disproportionately male fields — such as IT —may position them for greater success.

    graduation On a recent episode of “Morning Edition,” National Public Radio’s social science correspondent, Shankar Vedantam, examined a study from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst that looked into why women drop out of predominantly male fields, like engineering and math.
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