Study suggests grouping women working within disproportionately male fields — such as IT —may position them for greater success.

Inspiring Success - A blog from Creating IT Futures

Study suggests grouping women working within disproportionately male fields — such as IT —may position them for greater success.

Jun 23, 2016
graduationThe tale is well known and disconcerting: Women do not pursue STEM careers —science, technology, engineering and math — at the same rates as men. Only 18 percent of engineering majors in college are women.

Why is that? A researcher at the University of Massachusetts, psychologist Nilanjana Dasgupta, conducted a social experiment to try to find out. National Public Radio’s social science correspondent, Shankar Vedantum, featured the study on a recent episode of “Morning Edition.”

One takeaway Dasgupta took from her study is that tech companies or engineering schools should consider pooling women into work groups, rather than spreading them out across the entire organization. Women who experience professional camaraderie with their gender peers seem more likely to persevere than when they are the “token” females.

The Creating IT Futures Foundation — the philanthropic arm of CompTIA — recently took this approach when it sponsored a women-only IT-Ready class. You can read more about that groundbreaking experience here.


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Creating IT Futures

A 501(c)(3) charity was established in 1998 by CompTIA, the Information Technology Industry Trade Association, as a way to help people improve their lives through IT careers.

Mission

We help populations that are under-represented in IT and individuals who are lacking in opportunity to prepare for, secure and be successful in IT careers.

Contact

Creating IT Futures
c/o CompTIA
3500 Lacey Road, Suite 100
Downers Grove, IL 60515

Phone: (630) 678-8300
Email: info@creatingitfutures.org